CCHD Spring 2014

New Applications of Intense Longitudinal Analysis in Developmental Science

[Meetings are MONDAYS 2:00-3:15. For schedule and posted readings click here.]

Modern developmental science posits individuals as part of a larger multifaceted dynamic system. Yet, traditional statistical methods are not in accord with this conceptualization of individual behavior. Methodological advances apt for developmental science and their integration with current research is the focus of this semester’s consortium series.

Data analytic issues come to the forefront with our improved understanding of developmental processes. One issue relates to the increased interest and availability of intense longitudinal data (i.e., time-series data) of psychological phenomena. These data allow researchers to investigate the dynamic structure of processes and the dynamic interplay among variables. However, the analysis of intense longitudinal data in psychology presents unique challenges. Traditional time-series models are employed with one unit of analysis at a time because the goal is to understand the unique characteristic dynamics of such unit. Thus, if developmental applications with time-series data are of interest, one must decide how to adapt these models to provide information about multiple (rather than single) individuals. In this context, we must devise how to identify subgroups of individuals for which dynamic processes operate in similar ways.

A second issue entails the consideration of models for dyads, triads, quads, or even larger social networks. When individuals’ data are collected as part of a larger related group, there are dependencies that must be incorporated into statistical models. As such, we need analytical tools that help us consider these dependencies. How can dyadic (or larger group) models be used with time-series data? This question is even more challenging when we consider another core aspect of developmental science; namely, the inclusion of multiple levels of analysis for improving our understanding of development. How can biological, contextual, and cultural measures be integrated analytically to obtain an improved account of development? By narrowing down our research questions, our modeling techniques can also be simplified. However, this simplification might come at the expense of more realistic and accurate description of developmental processes.

  1. What are the cutting-edge methods in developmental science? Is the complexity of these methods balanced by their unique contributions to understanding development?
  2. How can you take advantage of advanced methodology to increase the quality of your own research?
  3. Is developmental science as a field adopting modeling techniques that keep up with its goals? Alternatively, are statistical models that align with core research questions in developmental science available?
  4. The majority of research in developmental science is based on data that are collected at large time intervals across long periods of time (i.e., panel data).  As time-series data become more prevalent in the future, how can developmental science profit most from these data?

Please note that the Proseminar will meet on Mondays from 2:00 – 3:15 PM, in the CDS lower level classroom, with the exception of our capstone lecture to be held in Hyde Hall on October 21st. Although we strongly encourage in-person attendance, we will also webcast the seminar to classroom locations at our affiliated institutions (again with the exception of our capstone lecture). For more information about webcasted seminars, visit this link.

Organizing Committee:

Laura Castro-Schilo, Committee Chair, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Daniel Bauer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Kenneth Bollen, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Jennifer Coffman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Patrick Curran, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Andrea Hussong, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Cathi Propper, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

SPRING 2014 SCHEDULE and READINGS

Date Speaker Institutional Affiliation Title Readings

January
13

Class Meeting Only
Cairns_2000 Cairns_Costello_Elder_1996 Gottlieb_Halpern_2002 Magnusson_Cairns_1996
Hamaker_2012
Reis_2012
Schwarz_2012

 


January
20

Martin Luther King Day
No Meeting

January
27

Introduction and Panel Discussion
 Rovine_Lo_2012   Schmitz_2012               Suls_1998

February
3

Patrick Curran

UNC
Chapel Hill

“Separating Person-Specific and Time-Specific Components of Developmental Change”
 
Curran_Bauer_2011 Curran_Howard_Bainter_Lane _McGinley_2013 Curran_Lee_Howard_Lane _MacCallum_2012

February
10

Pascal Deboeck

Kansas
University

“One person’s error is another’s treasure; Using derivatives to describe intraindividual variability
Deboeck_2012 Deboeck_Montpetit_2009

February
17

Nilam Ram

Penn State
University

“Moving into a Data Rich World: Implications for Developmental Theory and Method”
Ram_Brose_Molenaar_2013 Ram_etal_2013 Ram_etal_2014 Ram_Gerstorf_2009
February
24
Laura Richman
Duke
University
“Measuring the relationship between discrimination, ambulatory blood pressure, and emotion over a 24-hour period”
Euteneuer_2013 Richman_2010


March
3

Andrea Hussong
and Nisha Gottfredson

UNC
Chapel Hill

“Time sampling dynamic processes: Examples from the study of self-medication”
Gottfredson_Hussong_2011 Gottfredson_Hussong_2013 Hussong_Burns_2013
March
10
Spring Break
No Meeting



March
17

Jean-Philippe
Laurenceau

University
of Delaware

“Using Intensive Longitudinal Methods to Study Dyadic Relationships”
Laurenceau_2010 Laurenceau_2012

March
24

Michael Macy

Cornell
University

“Big Data and Temporal Rhythms”
Golder_Macy_2011
March
31
Candice
Odgers
Duke
University
“Small phones, ‘big data’, and what developmental scientists may learn from bringing the two together”
Odgers_2013
Odgers_2009
April
7
Laura
Castro-Schilo
UNC
Chapel Hill
“Idiographic models: Benefits, promises, and extensions”
 Castro-Schilo_Ferrer_2013
April
14
Scott Hofer
University of Victoria
“Intensive Measurement Designs: Optimizing Detection of Within-Person Changes in Cognition and Health”


April
21
John Nesselroade
University of Virginia
“Units of Analysis, Measurement, and Modeling Process: If Only I Were Beginning to do Developmental Science Again…”
Nesselroade Nesselroade_Molenaar_2010

April
28

Andrea Hussong
and Nisha Gottfredson
UNC
Chapel Hill

 

 “Time sampling dynamic processes: Examples from the study of self-medication”
Gottfredson_Hussong_2011
Gottfredson_Hussong_2013
Hussong_Burns_2013